Connect with us

Fitness

Intermittent Energy Restriction Could Be A Weight-Loss Game Changer

close-woman-sportswear-measuring-her-waist

Recent research suggests that shedding pounds through a method known as intermittent energy restriction (IER) can not only help with significant weight loss but also encourage notable changes in the gut microbiome as well as enhance brain activity. All of this, taken together, can potentially aid in sustained weight loss efforts.

In this recent study, researchers closely examined stool samples, blood measurements, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). All three of these when taken together show the alterations in gut microbiome and brain activity in 25 Chinese individuals with obesity undergoing an IER diet. The participants, with an average age of 27 and a body mass index (BMI) between 28 and 45, engaged in alternating periods of eating in a calorie deficit and eating at maintenance calories.

Thus, the study was limited in both scope and duration. However, it is encouraging for people who have struggled with obesity and long-term changes in their eating habits for the kind of prolonged weight loss those suffering from obesity need. 

Throughout the study, participants were subject to a high-controlled fasting phase for 32 days, reducing their caloric intake by one-quarter of their basic energy intake. This was then followed by a 30-day “low-controlled fasting phase.” By the study’s conclusion, participants had achieved an average weight loss of 7.6 kilograms (a little over 16 pounds), equivalent to approximately 7.8%. The study also noted a decrease in the activity of brain regions associated with appetite regulation and addiction.

Examining the gut microbiome, researchers observed a significant increase in the abundance of healthy bacteria, while unhealthy bacteria decreased. Notably, the abundance of certain healthy bacteria correlated positively with brain regions linked to attention, motor inhibition, emotion, and learning. Conversely, the reduction in E. coli, a significant finding, was associated negatively with brain regions crucial for executive functions, including the determination to lose weight.

While there should be little surprise at the substantial weight and body fat percentage reduction, due to caloric restriction, the impact on both gut health and brain function was an intriguing shock to researchers. This underscores the unexpected influence of food intake restriction on specific brain activities, as well as buttresses the beliefs of many who have touted gut health’s role in brain functioning for years now. 

Indeed, the study’s results align with an evolving understanding of the intricate relationship between the gut, the brain, and weight management. Lifestyle interventions, such as IER, can begin synchronized changes across the brain-gut-microbiome axis. This shows that there is a virtuous cycle of sorts when it comes to getting just one of these areas squared away. 

The reasons behind the observed effects of IER on the gut microbiome and brain activity is slightly more obscure. However, initial research reveals a bidirectional communication link between the gut and the brain. As the body shifts from using glucose to metabolizing stored fats during fasting, hormonal and neurotransmitter activity undergoes alterations, influencing brain regions related to appetite, motivation, and addiction. Simultaneously, the gut microbiome, responsive to dietary changes, produces signaling molecules that impact the brain, leading to a synchronized response across the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

While serotonin, a hormone known to regulate appetite and mood, may play a role in these changes, further research is needed to explore the intricate mechanisms at play. Again, the research study was very limited and, at the very least, a wider and longer-duration study will be needed to even verify the results of this first study. 

For those interested in trying IER, a gradual approach is best, starting with shorter fasting periods and progressively extending them over time. Emphasizing nutrient-dense foods, including adequate protein, and staying hydrated are crucial aspects of the diet. Listening to one’s body and adjusting fasting periods based on individual comfort and tolerance is essential.

However, caution is advised, as improperly planned IER diets may lead to nutrient deficiencies. Consulting with a professional, especially for individuals with specific medical conditions, is recommended before embarking on an IER journey. Additionally, those with a history of disordered eating should avoid this style of eating.

In conclusion, this study underscores the potential benefits of IER not only in facilitating weight loss but also in positively influencing appetite regulation, willpower, and emotion. While IER may not suit everyone, it emerges as an effective tool for some individuals on their weight loss journey.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fitness

Stay Pain Free With These Simple Stretches

fitness-couple-stretching-outdoors-park-young

When it comes to staying pain-free, sometimes it’s a joint effort between you and your physical trainer. However, if you don’t have a trainer, here are simple stretching tips to prevent hip, back, and ankle pain. In this article, we’ll explore these tips and how they can help you stay mobile and pain-free. 

Mobility is simply how well your joints move. Someone who has strong mobility will be strong within different ranges of motion. It’s important to train mobility before engaging in exercises like weightlifting and even walking.

Walking involves a lot from the body: foot plantar flexion, ankle dorsiflexion, hip flexion and extension, rotation in the pelvis, and stability in the core. Doing mobility exercises before a walk is important to prime the body for all these functions. By enhancing mobility, you can improve your performance and reduce the risk of injuries.

Mobility Exercises

Centenari shared two effective mobility exercises that can be done before a walk to prevent pain and improve joint function.

The CAR Ankle Exercise

CAR stands for controlled articular rotations. This exercise involves taking the joint through its full range of motion, and exploring how well you can control these outer ranges. This helps uncover where you may be limited or where progress can be made, both neurologically and kinesthetically.

How to Perform the CAR Ankle Exercise

 

  1. Sit on the floor and raise your right leg off the ground.
  2. Pull your right leg to your chest by using both hands to hold up your knee, keeping your leg suspended in the air.
  3. Create small circles with your foot by pointing your toe and rotating your ankle.
  4. Perform the rotation in one direction for 30 seconds, then switch directions for another 30 seconds.
  5. Repeat the exercise with the other leg.
  6. Practice the exercise for 90 seconds on each side.

This exercise helps improve the range of motion and strength in your ankles, which is essential for walking and other physical activities.

The 90-90 Exercise

The 90-90 exercise is a floor-based position that focuses on hip internal and external rotation. It not only helps increase the range of motion and functionality in the hips but also addresses low back issues that often stem from hip dysfunction.

How to Perform the 90-90 Exercise

  1. Sit on the floor with your right leg bent in front of you at a 90-degree angle.
  2. Position your left leg behind you, also bent at a 90-degree angle.
  3. Sit up straight, take a deep breath, and slowly stretch yourself over your right knee.
  4. Hold the stretch for one second before sitting up again.
  5. Do it again for 90 seconds, then switch to the other side.
  6. Perform the same stretch on the left side.

This exercise helps improve hip mobility and can alleviate lower back pain by addressing hip dysfunction.

Incorporating these simple mobility exercises into your routine can help you stay pain-free and improve your overall joint function. Whether you’re an athlete or just someone looking to stay active, maintaining good mobility is key to preventing injuries and enhancing performance. Remember to consult with your doctor or a physical trainer to ensure these exercises are appropriate for your needs and abilities. Stay active, stay mobile, and stay pain-free!

Will you be using these mobility exercises? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Continue Reading

Fitness

Exercises Enhances Effectiveness of Cancer Treatments in Seniors

elderly-couple-stretching-gym

New research suggests that exercise could make certain cancer treatments more effective. Specifically, a study has shown that moderate-to-vigorous exercise can help improve antibody therapies used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This form of leukemia affects the white blood cells and is common among older adults. In this article, we’ll explain how exercise can potentially boost cancer treatment and what this means for seniors battling this disease.

Researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Bath conducted a study involving 20 people aged between 45 and 82 who were diagnosed with CLL but had not yet started treatment. These participants were asked to engage in a 30-minute session of moderate-to-vigorous cycling. Blood samples were taken before, immediately after, and an hour after the exercise session.

The researchers found that exercise increased the number of natural killer cells in the blood by 254%. Natural killer cells are a type of immune cell that can target and kill cancer cells. This increase is significant because natural killer cells play a crucial role in fighting cancer.

How Exercise Helps

Immediately after exercise, the researchers noted a 67% increase in the number of cancer cells in the blood samples compared to the samples taken before exercise. This might seem alarming, but it actually means that the exercise helped move the cancer cells out of hiding in the body and into the bloodstream, where they can be more easily targeted by treatments.

The study focused on an antibody therapy called Rituximab, commonly used to treat CLL. Rituximab works by attaching to a specific protein on the surface of cancer cells, making them easier for natural killer cells to recognize and attack.

The researchers tested the blood samples with and without Rituximab. They found that the natural killer cells were twice as effective at killing cancer cells when Rituximab was present, especially in the samples taken immediately after exercise. This suggests that exercise can enhance the effectiveness of antibody therapy by making cancer cells more vulnerable to attack.

Potential Benefits for Seniors

These findings are particularly relevant for seniors undergoing treatment for CLL. The potential for exercise to improve the efficacy of antibody therapies like Rituximab could offer new hope for better treatment outcomes. Moreover, the study suggests that exercise might help in monitoring patients after they have completed treatment. By increasing the number of detectable cancer cells in the blood, exercise could make it easier to spot any remaining or returning cancer cells.

Dr. James Turner from the University of Birmingham highlighted the potential benefits of this research, stating that it could open up new avenues for improving cancer treatments. However, he also emphasized the need for further studies to confirm these findings in larger groups of patients undergoing treatment.

Dr. John Campbell from the University of Bath added that exercise seems to help move cancer cells into the bloodstream, where they are more susceptible to treatment. This could be particularly useful for patients in the monitoring phase after treatment.

The Importance of Personalized Exercise Plans

While the results are promising, it is crucial for seniors to discuss any new exercise routines with their doctors. Caroline Geraghty, a Senior Specialist Information Nurse at Cancer Research UK, advises cancer patients to seek medical advice before starting any exercise program. Each person’s needs and abilities are different, and it’s important to find the right type of exercise that is both safe and beneficial.

This research adds to the growing body of evidence that exercise can play a valuable role in cancer treatment. For seniors with CLL, incorporating moderate-to-vigorous exercise into their routine could potentially enhance the effectiveness of their treatments and improve their overall health. As always, consult with healthcare providers to create a personalized exercise plan that suits your needs and abilities.

Exercise is known to improve physical and mental well-being, and now, it may also be a powerful ally in the fight against cancer. As research continues, we hope to see more concrete recommendations on how to best incorporate exercise into cancer treatment plans. For now, staying active within your capabilities and under medical guidance remains a beneficial approach for overall health and well-being.

What do you think of the findings of these studies? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Continue Reading

Fitness

How to Level Up Your Sprinting Game for Weight Loss

sport-fitness-runner-man-running-on

Physical activities such as jogging, walking, cycling, and sprinting are well-known for engaging the musculoskeletal system and expending energy. Among these, Sprint Interval Training (SIT) has gained considerable attention in sports physiology for its potential to improve athletic performance and overall well-being. SIT involves short bursts of intense exercise followed by brief periods of rest, and the structure of these cycles can significantly affect physiological outcomes. Recent research from Japan highlights the benefits and optimization of SIT protocols, providing valuable insights into this versatile training method.

Recent Study on Sprint Interval Training

A team of researchers from Japan, including Dr. Takaki Yamagishi from the Japan Institute of Sports Sciences and Waseda University, and Professor Yasuo Kawakami from the Faculty of Sport Sciences at Waseda University, conducted a study to explore the benefits of different SIT protocols. Published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise on March 7, 2024, this study aimed to establish the minimum effective dose of exercise necessary to achieve significant training benefits.

Dr. Yamagishi emphasized the goal of determining the least amount of exercise needed to improve aerobic fitness. Supported by Professor Kawakami and other collaborators, the team used a multifaceted approach to investigate the effects of two different sprint interval exercises (SIE) on physiological and metabolic responses.

The researchers matched the total duration of sprinting and the sprint-to-rest ratio in two different SIE protocols:

  • SIE20: Two 20-second sprints with 160-second recovery periods.
  • SIE10: Four 10-second sprints with 80-second recovery periods.

The team measured the impact of these protocols by examining several key indicators:

  • Pulmonary Oxygen Uptake (V̇O2): To assess whole-body oxidative metabolism.
  • Tissue Oxygenation Index (∆TOI): To measure changes in thigh muscle oxygenation.
  • T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): To evaluate thigh muscle activation.

The study found that both SIE protocols significantly enhanced whole-body and peripheral oxidative metabolism and activated the major thigh muscles, as evidenced by increased V̇O2 levels, ∆TOI, and MRI T2 values. However, SIE20 outperformed SIE10 in several aspects:

  • Greater Peripheral Oxidative Metabolism: SIE20 induced more substantial oxidative metabolism compared to SIE10.
  • Efficiency of Successive Sprints: Successive sprints in SIE10 did not correlate with greater oxidative metabolism, indicating that longer sprints with adequate recovery may be more effective.

Real-Life Applications and Impact

Dr. Yamagishi highlighted the practical implications of their findings, noting that time constraints are a significant barrier to regular physical activity. The exercise modalities tested in the study require less than 15 minutes to complete, making them accessible and time-efficient while providing considerable health benefits.

The findings from this study address important research gaps in SIT, particularly regarding the effects of sprint duration and repetitions on aerobic and metabolic responses. The researchers suggest that in-depth studies on low-volume SIT could enhance training programs and exercise regimens.

Dr. Yamagishi expressed hope that their study could contribute to updated exercise guidelines proposed by major organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine. Future research could build on these findings to establish the dose-response relationship between exercise volume or intensity and the degree of training adaptations.

Sprint Interval Training, when optimized, offers significant benefits for improving aerobic fitness and metabolic health in a time-efficient manner. The study by Dr. Yamagishi and his team provides valuable insights into the optimal structure of SIT protocols, paving the way for more effective and accessible exercise regimens. As technology and research advance, SIT could become an integral part of fitness programs, helping individuals achieve their health and performance goals efficiently.

Do you sprint? Will this study change how you sprint? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

Continue Reading

Trending