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Debunking Fitness Myths: Unveiling the Truth for a Healthier You

Lifting Heavy Weights

The world of fitness is filled with myths. This is harmful because too many people structure their workouts around these myths or else avoid working out properly entirely because of the myths that they heard. Fitness myths aren’t limited to people 

Myth: Cardio is the Only Way to Lose Weight

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Not only is cardio not the only way to lose weight, it might not even be the best. Losing weight is a simple function of CICO or “calories in, calories out.” The bottom line is that you lose weight when you’re at a caloric deficit and gain weight when you’re in a caloric surplus. 

The heavy lifting when it comes to losing weight is done by figuring out what constitutes maintenance calories for you personally. Then you need to eat less than that. Cardio can be helpful in as much as it burns calories and creates a greater caloric deficit. But there’s nothing magical about cardio that sensible dieting won’t do. 

Myth: Crunches Are the Best for Six-Pack Abs

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There’s an old saying that “abs are made in the kitchen” or that the best movement for a six-pack is fork putdowns. 

Both of these are true in as much as you already have abs. What you want is to make them visible in the form of a six-pack. This is mostly achievable through dieting properly. But we’ve got some bad news: Some people just have awful genetics for six-pack abs. No matter what, the last place their body wants to lose weight is in their midsection. And there’s nothing you can do to spot reduce around the waistline. 

In fact, most elite-tier bodybuilders do very little abdominal work, because they’re trying to retain a trim waistline, something that a lot of heavy ab work just isn’t going to help with. If you want a six-pack, see our first myth and start changing your diet accordingly. 

Myth: Lifting Heavy Weights Will Make You Bulky

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Many people, women especially, are under the mistaken impression that simply looking at a barbell is going to transform them into the kind of hulking freak that wins Mr. Olympia. In reality, the guys who compete in elite bodybuilding eat a ridiculous amount of calories in an average day and inject a Herculean amount of steroids into their butts. You’re not going to look like them without a lot of effort directed toward that end.

What’s more, weightlifting for the most part doesn’t make people bulky unless that’s the look they’re chasing after. Muscle weighs more than fat, so you might not like what you see on the scale, but when combined with sensible dieting and moderate low-intensity cardio, lifting weights can be one of the best ways to shed fat.

Remember what Arnold once told a man who said he’d never want to look like the Austrian Oak: “Don’t worry, you won’t.”

Myth: You Shouldn’t Exercise Every Day

Rest and recovery are absolutely essential to maintaining proper health and fitness, even if your goal is to be a world-champion powerlifter. But here’s the thing: You can absolutely do some kind of “exercise” activity 365 calendar days every year and not die. In fact, you can be quite healthy doing that. 

The point to remember is that you can’t go absolutely ham every day of the week or yes, you will burn out, get injured, see your gains backslide, or all of the above. So prioritize active recovery like light cardio, stretching, yoga, and other things to keep yourself fit and trim while keeping active. 

Myth: You Can’t Build Muscle After 40

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The honest truth is that you’re not going to build muscle at 40 like a 20-year-old. That’s true. However, what is completely untrue is that if you’ve been a couch potato for the first 40 years of your life it’s too late for you to do anything of value in the gym.

There are tons of men competing in the highly competitive sports of powerlifting and bodybuilding masters who never touched a barbell before their 40th birthday. Your age might slow you down compared to the younger whipper snappers, but it’s not going to completely take you out of the game. 

Avoid the myths and focus on the reality. That’s the best thing for anyone to do when they’re looking to get fit, stay fit, and make consistent progress toward their fitness goals day by day. 

What fitness myths do you hear repeated that you can’t stand? Leave your “favorite” in the comment below.

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Fitness

Say Goodbye to BMI: Here’s the New Metric For Measuring Healthy Weight

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For decades, Body Mass Index (BMI) has been the go-to method for estimating a person’s body fat and categorizing their weight status. However, new research suggests that BMI might not be the best tool for this job. A study published in JAMA Network Open introduces the Body Roundness Index (BRI) as a more precise alternative.

The Limitations of BMI

BMI, developed in 1832, has been widely used since the 1980s. Despite its popularity, BMI has significant limitations. It calculates body fat based on height and weight alone, without considering other crucial factors like muscle mass, bone density, and fat distribution. This means BMI can misclassify individuals with different body compositions. For example, athletes with high muscle mass often have a higher BMI, which inaccurately suggests they have excess body fat. Conversely, older adults with less muscle mass might have a lower BMI, overlooking excess fat.

What is the Body Roundness Index?

The BRI aims to address these shortcomings by incorporating additional measurements. Unlike BMI, which only uses height and weight, BRI also considers hip and waist circumferences. These extra measurements help estimate total body fat and visceral fat more accurately. Visceral fat, a deep belly fat surrounding the organs, is particularly harmful to health.

How BRI Works

BRI is based on the concept that the human body is more egg-shaped than cylindrical. By comparing waist or hip circumference to height, BRI provides a more nuanced picture of body composition. Developed by Diana Thomas, a mathematics professor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, BRI uses the mathematical concept of eccentricity. Essentially, the closer someone is to being circle-shaped, the closer their BRI will be to zero. Conversely, the more they resemble a straight line, the closer their BRI will be to one.

Why BRI is More Accurate

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The study analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, involving around 33,000 Americans over nearly 20 years. Researchers found that BRI was better at categorizing individuals’ weight status and estimating their body composition. When plotting the risk of death based on BRI, the data formed a bell curve, clearly showing higher risks at both extremes. BMI data, on the other hand, produced a flatter curve, masking important variations in the middle range.

Practical Benefits of BRI

One of the main advantages of BRI is its accessibility. Unlike specialized scales or scans, which are not always available or accurate, BRI only requires a measuring tape. This simplicity makes it easier for more people to use, promoting better health tracking across various settings.

While BRI is a significant improvement over BMI, it’s not without its own limitations. It still doesn’t measure muscle mass, which is a crucial component of overall health. However, experts believe BRI is a step in the right direction toward more accurately measuring body composition.

As we learn more about the complexities of body composition, it’s clear that BMI is not a one-size-fits-all measure. The Body Roundness Index offers a more accurate and accessible way to assess obesity and related health risks. Have you ever measured your BRI or used another method to understand your body composition? Share your experiences and thoughts in the comments below!

 

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Overweight and Obesity in Youth Linked to Increased Stroke Risk in Women

A comprehensive analysis of over 50 years of health data has revealed a significant correlation between being overweight or obese at a young age and the risk of experiencing an ischemic (clot-caused) stroke before the age of 55 in women. This research, published in Stroke, the journal of the American Stroke Association, highlights the long-term health impacts of early life weight issues.

The study, conducted in Finland, examined the influence of body weight at ages 14 and 31 on stroke risk. It found female participants who were overweight by 14 had significantly increased chances of strokes later in life –  even if they lost the weight by 31. Similarly, women who were overweight at age 31 had a higher risk of stroke regardless of their weight at age 14. Notably, this increased risk was not observed in men who were overweight at ages 14 or 31. However, men with obesity at age 31 showed a higher risk of bleeding stroke compared to women with obesity at the same age.

Long-term Health Effects of Early Weight Issues

Long-term Health Effects of Early Weight Issues

Lead study author Ursula Mikkola, B.M., from the Research Unit of Population Health at the University of Oulu, emphasized the long-term health effects of being overweight, even if the excess weight is temporary. She advocates for healthcare professionals to address overweight and obesity in young people by promoting healthier eating patterns and physical activity, but to do so in a non-judgmental and non-stigmatizing manner.

Data from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966

Data from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966

The researchers utilized data from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966, which has followed more than 10,000 individuals from birth into their 50s. This extensive dataset allowed for a thorough analysis of the impact of body mass index (BMI) at different ages on the risk of early stroke.

The study found that approximately 1 in 20 participants experienced a clot-caused stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) during the follow-up period. Women with obesity at age 14 were 87% more likely to experience a clot-caused stroke, and those with obesity at age 31 were 167% more likely to have a stroke compared to their peers at appropriate weight. Women with obesity at age 31 also had nearly 3 ½ times the risk of bleeding stroke, while men with obesity at the same age had more than 5 ½ times the risk of bleeding stroke.

Implications for Preventive Health

Implications for Preventive Health

The findings suggest that addressing weight issues early in life can have a significant impact on reducing stroke risk later on. Mikkola advises that adopting a healthy lifestyle, including balanced eating, regular physical activity, avoiding smoking, and managing other health parameters like blood pressure and cholesterol, can help mitigate the risk of stroke even if one was overweight during youth.

The study found that the increased risk of clot-caused stroke was specific to women, with researchers currently investigating the underlying reasons for this gender disparity. This research will help to better understand the complex interactions between gender, weight, and stroke risk.

Editorial Insights

Editorial Insights

In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Larry Goldstein, a member of the American Heart Association Stroke Council, noted the significance of these findings. He highlighted that while the data supports the association between early-life overweight/obesity and stroke risk, further research is needed to determine if reducing overweight/obesity in younger populations will lead to lower stroke rates in adults.

The analysis included 10,491 participants in their 50s, with BMI measured at ages 14 and 31. The study identified ischemic strokes and TIAs using national hospital and death registers and adjusted for various factors, including smoking status, education levels, and age at first menstrual period for women.

However, as an observational study, it cannot definitively establish a cause-and-effect relationship between weight and early stroke risk. Additionally, the study’s population was exclusively Finnish, which may limit the generalizability of the results to other populations.

This study underscores the critical importance of early weight management and healthy lifestyle choices in reducing the risk of stroke later in life. Addressing obesity and overweight issues during youth can have profound long-term health benefits, particularly for women.

What steps have you taken to manage your weight and reduce health risks? How do you think these findings should influence public health strategies? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below. Your insights could help others take proactive steps towards a healthier future.

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Overweight? Here’s WHEN You Should Exercise

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Recent research from Spain suggests that exercising in the evening can be particularly beneficial for managing blood sugar levels in people who are overweight or obese. This study underscores the importance of precision in exercise prescription, highlighting that the timing of physical activity can significantly impact its effectiveness.

Conducted by a team led by Jonatan R. Ruiz, a professor of physical activity and health at the University of Granada, the research tracked the blood sugar levels and physical activity patterns of 186 overweight or obese adults. Participants were divided based on their exercise times: between 6 a.m. and noon, noon to 6 p.m., or 6 p.m. to midnight.

The results were striking. Those who exercised in the evening exhibited lower blood sugar levels throughout the day, at night, and overall, compared to those who exercised earlier in the day. This effect was even more pronounced in participants with prediabetes, a condition that significantly increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

The Importance of Timing in Exercise

Study author Jonatan R. Ruiz emphasized that certified sports and medical professionals should consider the optimal timing of exercise to enhance the effectiveness of the physical activity programs they prescribe.

The findings, to be published later this year in Obesity, the flagship journal of the Obesity Society, contribute to a growing body of evidence suggesting that the timing of exercise can influence metabolic outcomes. For instance, a UK study released in April found that nighttime physical activity could lead to lower morning blood sugar levels. Additionally, research from May 2023 indicated that adults with Type 2 diabetes saw the best blood sugar control when they were most active between 1:43 p.m. and 5 p.m.

Why Evening Exercise?

The reasons why evening exercise may be particularly effective for blood sugar management are not yet fully understood. However, it is hypothesized that exercising later in the day may better align with the body’s circadian rhythms, which regulate many physiological processes, including metabolism.

Additionally, post-meal exercise is known to help manage blood sugar spikes. Given that many people consume their largest meal in the evening, engaging in physical activity afterward could help mitigate these spikes and improve overall blood sugar control.

Practical Implications

Dr. Lucy Chambers, head of research communications at Diabetes UK, commented on these findings, noting that while afternoon exercise appears to offer significant benefits, the most crucial factor is consistency. This could be before work, during a lunch break, or in the evening.

For individuals with Type 2 diabetes or those at risk, incorporating evening exercise into their daily routine could be a strategic way to manage blood sugar levels. Activities such as brisk walking, jogging, cycling, or even engaging in a group fitness class can be effective.

Broader Context

With over 38 million Americans living with diabetes, characterized by elevated blood sugar levels, finding effective management strategies is crucial. Alongside dietary modifications and medications, exercise is a cornerstone of diabetes management. This new research provides an additional layer of nuance, suggesting that not only the amount and type of exercise but also the timing can make a significant difference.

In summary, evening exercise could offer a strategic advantage for blood sugar management in overweight and obese individuals. While further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms behind this effect, the current findings support the inclusion of evening workouts as part of a comprehensive approach to managing blood sugar levels and overall metabolic health.

Have you tried adjusting the timing of your exercise routine to see if it affects your blood sugar levels? What strategies have worked best for you? Share your experiences and insights in the comments below. Your contributions could help others find effective ways to manage their health through exercise.

 

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